Sound Lessons

Before presenting any of these lessons to students, be sure to read:
"How to Present a Rock-it Science Lesson."
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Difficulty Level: This indicates how difficult it is for the teacher to present the lesson, not how hard it is for the student to do the experiment. Difficulty levels vary according to type of equipment needed, preparation time, and scarcity or expense of certain materials.

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 Sound
Glove-o-Phones trailer
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Glove-o-Phones -- Students discover how a vibrating balloon is like their vocal cords. They build a musical instrument that makes weird sounds when they blow into it. This relates to vibration, vocal cords, air pressure, and sound amplification. Difficulty: Easy
Laser Sound Waves trailer
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Laser Sound Waves -- Students use a laser beam to transform the sound of their own voice into crazy patterns. This relates to light waves, lasers, reflection, sound, vibration, and wavelengths. This lesson only works in rooms that can be darkened. Difficulty: Hard
Sound Effects with Cup trailer
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Sound Effects with Cup -- Students discover the different ways that sound travels through a piece of string, a rubber band, and a plastic cup. This relates to vibration, frequency, and sound amplification. Difficulty: Easy
Stethoscopes trailer
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Stethoscopes -- Students discover how sounds can travel through solids, liquids, and air using a simple stethoscope that they make and can keep. This relates to the anatomy of the ear, vibrations, sound amplification, and anatomy of the heart. Difficulty: Medium
Woodwinds trailer
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Woodwinds -- Discover how to make heavenly and then totally loud and disgusting sounds with tubes, reeds, balloons, and other weird materials. This relates to sound waves, vibration, pitch, and sound amplification. Difficulty: Easy
Zoob Tubes trailer
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Zoob Tubes -- Students experiment with echoes by constructing an echo chamber inside a cardboard tube containing a noisy spring. Then they try to make more noise than a rock concert with just their voices. This relates to sound waves, vibrations, echoes, and sound amplification. Difficulty: Hard

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